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The Glass House

Waldorf Manor : Book Four

By: Bella Bryce
Published By: Blushing Press
Copyright: 2014 by Blushing Books and Bella Bryce
Twenty Chapters / 105,000 Words
Heat Level:
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Waldorf Manor is enchanting. Not just because of the formality of its residents and the privilege of wealth, but because it guards and protects a lifestyle some could easily mistake as traditional. It isn't traditional to Brayden James, it's very deliberate. Beyond the protective gates of Waldorf Manor and Barton-Court House are the lives of two men who believe formality and discipline are necessary strongholds in life. Some strongholds, however, can be crippling; especially when they prevent a man from pursuing love.

Simultaneously, a thirty-year marriage is hanging by a thread and despite the shell of their lives being molded by similar wealth and formality, their roots have come undone. The mother of the groom can't let go of controlling everything around her, and her husband is finally faced with the consequences of his apathy. Either way, there is truth to be spoken, healing to come, love to be shown and plenty of discipline to be administered.

Author's Note: Bella Bryce is a writer of sweet romance and light age-play. This book contains romance, spanking, discipline and sensual build- up but no sex.

Chapter One

There were empty vodka bottles on the dingy floor as her foot caressed a path toward the light switch. Alice knew exactly how many steps it took to reach it because she'd counted those steps in the dark countless times before. But that night seemed different, it made her uneasy. Alice had never felt as uneasy as when her hand slid along the wall and she couldn't find the switch. She felt herself frown, but because it was pitch black there was no one to commiserate with her discomfort not that anyone would have. Alice's mother, Sally, was far from being a compassionate or empathetic person and her ever-rotating boyfriends were even less so; they never stuck around long enough to feel anything but arousal and subsequent relief, in any case. They always disappeared after the latter.

Alice exhaled a frustrated and concerned breath as she tentatively pushed her hand further along the wall higher then lower to no avail. The sound of extraneous breathing caused her eyes to widen and search the blackness in front of her frantically.

"Mum?" she asked, worriedly.

The breathing intensified and became more drawn out as if to communicate indifference.

"Mum!" Alice demanded, as her hand abandoned the wall and reached out in front of herself.

She took a hesitant step forward in the direction of the breaths and soon felt a hot, steamy response against her palm. Alice gulped, and her own breath shook as she followed her left foot forward in response to her right. Her fingers found their way to a piece of flesh Alice thought was her mother's nose, but the monster-like breath seemed to translate into the features she felt beneath them. Alice took in a sharp gasp and began to whimper.

"Mum!" as hot tears spilled down her cheeks. "Is that you?"

Alice's other hand investigated the disfigured face-like thing, her fear intensified with each new nook and cranny when she realised the parts were in the wrong place. There was hair where eyes should be, an oversized nose where the mouth belonged, still spewing its steady, fervid exhale. She expected the mouth to have been responsible for such heavy vapours and her mind instantly recognised just how inhuman the thing before her was, whom she knew despite complete lack of proof in the pitch-black darkness. And she knew it was her mother. Perhaps the exhaling from its nose was intended to trick her because from where one cheek should have been, Alice discovered a mouth with jagged teeth. Before her mind took note of the danger, the mouth of vicious and knife-like teeth opened and then snapped closed, slicing down, straight through Alice's fingers.

A high-pitched and unrestrained scream escaped Alice's lips and didn't stop until her body was forced into an unexpected embrace.

"Alice!"

Her eyes bulged open, and she saw a pair of arms surrounding her body. She realised where she was and pulled away.

"Where's my father?" she asked, breathing heavily as tears akin to the ones in her dream began to fill her eyes.

"Alice?" Brayden called, as he strode across the massive, luxurious bedroom. Celia moved away from the bedside as Brayden took her place and pulled Alice into his arms. "Darling, you're shaking," he said, glancing up at Celia before he secured her more tightly against his suit.

She closed her eyes, always finding comfort against his waistcoat and blazer. His cologne drifted into her senses as she continued to inhale deeply. It was definitely a nightmare, and the familiarity of Brayden's touch and smell reminded her it was over. He was never part of her nightmares, only her mother was.

Alice hadn't seen her mother since November - for less than an hour - and prior to that, not since the night she left home to live with Brayden James at Waldorf Manor ten months before. Christmas and New Year had just passed, so if the nightmare was a reaction or realisation from the breakdown in November, Alice thought it was a rather late one. Or perhaps it was timely, considering the beginning of February was approaching and would mark one year since moving to Waldorf and being adopted as Brayden's 'ten-year-old' daughter.

He kissed Alice's forehead and stroked the relaxed ringlets from within her hair ribbon that had come loose over the course of the night. Brayden looked down and was tempted to ask why Celia hadn't French plaited Alice's hair, as it was his preference, but providing comfort to his daughter was by far of greater concern in that moment.

"She was a monster." Alice shoved the words out of her mouth as if, without serious effort, she mightn't speak them. She didn't really want to tell him about it but found herself doing so anyway.

Brayden watched her pull away from his embrace and meet his eyes.

"Her face was all contorted, and she sounded like a dragon," Alice breathed. "I couldn't find the light switch, but it was like she was waiting to frighten me." Alice's eyes emphasised her fear more than her voice did.

Brayden wouldn't have spoken ill of Sally Oliver in front of Alice or to anyone. He had been raised better than that. But his thoughts tempted him to correct Alice by saying, 'I'm not surprised. Your mother is quite a monster.' Brayden was a gentleman, and to remind himself of that, he dismissed the private thoughts which were just as incriminating as any verbal admission. He wanted Alice to learn that speaking ill of others was inappropriate behaviour. No matter who they were or what they'd done. Forgiveness was stronger than hate, and it always won.

"I'm sorry, my darling," Brayden said, pulling her back into an embrace. "I'm sorry you were frightened." He softly kissed her hair and stroked her back. "I'm glad to say it's over now."

Celia watched Brayden, her eyes still a little wider than normal at the idea of Alice being trapped inside of a scary dream only to be pulled out of it by her own terror.

"A bath for Miss Alice, please," Brayden requested quietly, without looking up at his head housekeeper.

"Sir," she replied, just as gently, and vacated the bedside to the luxurious en-suite marble bathroom.

Brayden closed his eyes and kissed Alice's head once more. It was inevitable that renewed feelings of anger began to rise, which he once again ignored. He reminded himself that Alice's life prior to Waldorf Manor was broken, abused, and neglected because her mother had been all those things. Sally Oliver hadn't been a whole person for most of her life and didn't know how to give her daughter a secure, disciplined, or loving childhood. Alice had often been left to her own devices and Sally left to hers which had been alcohol. Sally would bring home a new boyfriend as often as once every week and consumed entire bottles of vodka four times that. The men always stayed longer than the alcohol.

"I will have Wellesley delay breakfast slightly. Celia will see you into the bath and help you dress."

Alice pulled away and looked up at the man she'd come to love as her father, and the only one she'd ever known.

"No." Alice frowned. It was far beyond customary for her to outwardly disagree with Brayden he had laid out clear and rigid expectations for her behaviour in his household  none of which included disobedience or backchat.

"I don't want her to be the reason our routine changes," Alice clarified, as if her mother might hear the annoyance in her voice and somehow feel remorseful for being the cause of the nightmare or countless painful memories. Even if Sally Oliver had heard, she wouldn't have cared.

"Alice." Brayden's fatherly tone refocused her attention. "The routine of this household is not changing because of her. You had a nightmare, my darling, and I can see you're quite shaken. There is always grace in this household when it's needed."

"I'm fine," she said, wiping her eyes with both hands. "I'm hungry."

Brayden wanted to smile as her implied age reappeared. Alice's eighteen years were meaningless when she'd arrived at Waldorf in February the year before, due to the lack of proper upbringing. Brayden felt the best way to integrate her was both to adopt her as his own, and to regress her age to ten years.

Firstly, Alice originally had no frame of reference for how to behave as an eighteen-year-old under his expectations. She also hadn't understood the mechanics of a healthy upbringing  understandably which included learning how to obey one's guardians or authority, being accountable for one's actions, receiving correction, and internalising it for the prevention of further misbehaviour. Lastly, that none of those former things were negative or that failure to adhere to such things made her 'bad.' Alice wasn't bad, she just hadn't been taught. So, Brayden removed those expectations from the beginning and promptly told Alice that she would be raised from the point where her behaviour reflected, which was ten years old. Brayden also realised that Alice hadn't needed an adult, platonic disciplinary relationship - such as the one they both understood her to be entering into she needed a father. His grief for Alice's past and incredible lack of 'fill in the blank here' had moved him to care very deeply, very quickly for her. That was when he decided to adopt her.

Brayden had been raising Alice as his ten-year-old daughter for nearly a year, keenly aware that her chronological, nineteenth birthday was approaching. That made no difference to him. He would move her age up (or down, if required, although he hadn't thus far) when he'd seen appropriate growth, maturity, and trust where it was needed. Admittedly, he dreaded an increase to her age. Brayden loved Alice exactly as she was even when she looked at him with furrowed eyebrows and articulated in a tone that she had no business taking with him.

"Look at me, please, young lady," Brayden said.

Alice reluctantly removed her hands from her face and obeyed.

"Speak to me properly," he requested, in his usual fatherly tone.

"May I please forgo my bath, Sir and descend upon the dining room to digest my eggs benedict with joyful candour? Please? Father dearest?" she asked, her tone returning to the politeness Brayden expected. "I would prefer that more heartily than a bath."

He raised expectant eyebrows, extracting a small sigh from Alice.

"Sorry, Sir," she admitted.

"Thank you. I don't need to remind you what sarcasm earns," he warned, his expectant eyebrows doing all the reminding Alice needed.

"No, Sir."

"Right." He glanced at his watch. It was the one designed by his late parents and given to him the night they were killed, at his 26th birthday ball. "I will let Celia carry on as usual then. Would you like anything before you come down for breakfast? I can have Wellesley bring you something to drink," Brayden said, stroking her loose ringlets.

"May I have orange juice, please?"

"Of course," he replied, then stood up from her bedside and pressed the discrete button surrounded by a brass plate near the exquisite king-sized, four-poster bed. One press of the button from Alice's bedroom meant orange juice, two meant a tea tray, and three meant Wellesley reported to her bedroom to find out what she wanted. The chefs, who never left the kitchens, relayed the message after starting the kettle or preparing a tray, which Wellesley finished, then delivered. Each bedroom had a different bell system for ordering from the kitchens and Brayden's was one press for tea, two for cappuccino, and three for Wellesley.

"I'll put your dress for today behind the changing screen and see you in the dining room spot on time, then." Brayden kissed her forehead.

"Yes, Father."

He stroked Alice's cheek for a moment before crossing the spacious room to recall the bath.

Alice exhaled as she flopped back down onto the layers of luxurious bedding and stared up at the canopy above her head. She listened to the sound of Brayden politely informing the head housekeeper that his daughter would no longer require a bath and that he would choose her dress for the day and hang it behind the changing screen. The respectful and very typical response to Brayden by everyone who wasn't his equal, 'yes, Sir,' was genuine as Celia turned the water off. Alice listened to his sturdy, expensive shoes walking confidently out of the marbled floor en-suite bathroom several hundred feet on the opposite side of the room then crossing diagonally toward Alice lying on the bed before veering to the left and the beautiful four-door wardrobe situated between two massive windows.

He opened two doors at one time. Every single dress, blouse and skirt was made to measure and to particular design specifications; meaning they had to be prim, charmingly juvenile, (without being infantile) and inspired by vintage. Alice's wardrobe consisted mainly of sailor dresses, box pleat pinafores, Peter Pan and scallop-collared blouses, pleated skirts, kilts, tights, knee socks, ribbons and patent shoes in pastel and primary colours that would make any preppy girl drool, and then some. Alice always looked like a child model out of a vintage catalogue and carried off the look with incredible confidence, considering for eighteen years she'd dressed as society expected her to; copy her peers and the runway. At least, that was the fashion for English teenagers most of the time. The stores always sold runway knockoffs, and once out of school uniform, that's exactly where the girls turned for their inspiration.

Brayden was of a very different mind-set when it came to wardrobe compared to anyone outside of his social circle; he dressed every day in three piece suits of varying colour and design, embracing the sophisticated prints of stripes, crests and discrete dots as were prevalent amongst young millionaires (and a select crowd of discerning twenty to sixty-year-old working-class men). He had an entire wardrobe of shoes ranging from brogues, boots and loafers to classic shiny black and two-toned Oxfords, amongst an impressive selection of braces, belts, ties and pocket squares, so it was no question when Alice moved to Waldorf that she would have anything less in her own wardrobe. It also meant that his butler, domestic staff, and guards in the brick building at the end of the half-mile gravel drive also looked their best and wore a very smart gender-appropriate uniform every day.

"Celia will choose your tights and shoes."

"Can't I wear knee socks?" Alice asked through the pillow she'd placed over her face. She loved feeling the cold side of her 1,000 thread count Egyptian cotton pillowcases. They always felt divine, just to tempt her further back into its comfort.

"No," Brayden replied, his eyes scanning the meticulously ordered display of clothes for the precise dress he wanted to put her in. "It's still winter, and regardless of the countless number of fireplaces in this house, Alice, I won't have you catching cold. Your bare knees need to be covered up until spring," he said, as he turned around with a satin hanger and a navy blue and white two-piece woollen sailor dress with red necktie.

"Be a good girl and sit up, please. Wellesley will be here in a minute with your tray," Brayden said, as he walked across the large room and disappeared behind the extravagant twelve-foot high, six-foot long Victorian changing screen.

Below a set of intricate brass hooks on the wall was a diagonally positioned Louis XV chair where Alice either perched or was ushered, depending on how much dawdling Celia caught her doing in the mornings. Alice always had Celia's help doing up unreachable buttons and zips in the morning, and very often if Alice fussed about too much, Celia would hurry her to the chair behind the screen and kneel down to get the girl's knee socks or tights started. Having fully embraced her ten-year-old state from the beginning coupled with the attitude of 'I hate mornings', Alice never rejected the head housekeeper's sometimes rather motherly assistance.

Alice was responsible for getting downstairs to the dining room and into her chair at the table, on time. Meals were at set times, three times per day, and Celia had a job to do in ushering the girl out of the bedroom, properly dressed, groomed and tidy.

Waldorf's chefs cooked gourmet, multi-course menus for every meal. His butler and other staff were expected to serve and wait at table at coordinating times, so a handful of staff were effected when meals were delayed or changed. Brayden taught Alice to respect their domestic staff's schedules as they were paid for much more than serving meals and their own routines didn't allow for lateness. Celia also knew that if Alice was late, she would expect to hear from Brayden on the matter as she was also responsible for curling Alice's hair and tying in the hair ribbons before she left for breakfast in the morning, then tidying Alice up again before dinner in the evenings.

"Good morning, Miss Alice," Wellesley, the loyal and long-serving butler to Waldorf Manor and the late Oliver James, said humbly as he entered the bedroom and took a left to the fireplace and formal sitting area.

"Morning, Wellesley," Alice chimed, her spirits instantly brightened by the faithful presence of the man who ran Waldorf directly under Brayden.

Alice was met halfway to the formal seating area in front of the fireplace by Brayden, who held out her dressing gown and gave her an expectant look. He had opinions about Alice getting out of bed and walking about her bedroom in her cotton nightdress. Brayden fully expected his daughter to put her slippers and gold quilted dressing gown with the cord sash tied neatly until she changed into her clothes for the day. He did the very same, although he never spent much time in his pyjamas, dressing gown, and slippers, because he went to bed not long before midnight. He woke and dressed early each morning as well, so there was little time spent out of his three-piece suits, which is exactly how he preferred it.

"Thank you, Wellesley," Alice said, glancing up at the butler she adored as Brayden finished tying her dressing gown sash about her small waist.

"Sit down and drink it properly, please," Brayden said, leaving her with another kiss on her forehead before exiting her bedroom in front of Wellesley.

Once the door was closed, Alice sat back against one of four Louis XV chairs arranged around the crackling fireplace in the ten foot stone inlay, holding a crystal glass full of freshly squeezed orange juice.

The pace at Waldorf was much slower than anything she'd been accustomed to previously. Alice had never 'sat down' to 'drink orange juice properly' before she became Brayden's daughter. She used to wander out of her bedroom at noon on the weekends in an oversized t-shirt and mismatched spotted socks to drink orange juice directly from the carton in her mother's house. Alice didn't miss that at all. Waldorf was good for her, and she knew it.

Alice instinctively smoothed down the pleats of her navy blue skirt and straightened the red necktie of the traditional woollen sailor top as she descended one set of the grand, double staircase which led down into the marbled foyer and Waldorf's entrance. Her navy blue tights disappeared beneath the matching skirt, although a pair of grey patent t-strap shoes accentuated her tiny ankles. She also pulled a clump of ringlets over her shoulder, so the long locks gave her face and shoulders a bit of definition.

She hated having all of her hair curled and kept behind her shoulders. Celia had tried to tightly pull half of Alice's hair into a red bow at the back of her head, but she managed to persuade the middle-aged housekeeper to instead loosely gather one section on either side. Celia had sighed and obliged Alice's request, glancing at the girl in the mirror as she sat at the beautiful cherry-wood dressing table looking innocent. She'd tied two red satin ribbons on either side, which Alice insisted should be somewhat visible when looking at her straight on, 'otherwise my face looks stupid.' Celia had clicked her tongue as she obliged the girl's request.

Alice turned left once she stepped down from the last stair into the foyer, entered through the double doors to the dining room, and took the long walk along the twenty-person dining table with chairs pushed obediently and to the spatial exactness of military precision. Alice was fully aware that Wellesley measured the distance of everything at Waldorf, especially the dining room place settings, with a ruler. When Alice had first arrived, such things made her giggle or frown, but the idea no longer entertained her since she'd become accustomed to the particularities of Waldorf Manor.

"Father," Alice said, when she reached Brayden at the head.

The top half of the table was the only part of the long dining table that was set for the two of them, and meals (amongst everything else) were always formal. Before Alice, Brayden used to sit at the head alone with the formal setting before him and the remaining chairs to remind him that apart from his staff, he was alone. Having only been responsible for Alice for approaching one year, those days felt strangely unreal when at the time it had been terribly lonely; he'd just hidden it quite well.

Alice planted a kiss on his cheek after greeting him, as she always did at breakfast, then returned a few steps and claimed the grand upholstered and intricately carved dining chair to his left. Wellesley pulled it out and subsequently slid it in to precisely the place Alice liked.

"Has Uncle Bennett been to collect Elisabeth already?" Alice's posh accent rang sweetly in Brayden's ears as she laid her cloth napkin neatly in her lap. The way she spoke was nearly indistinguishable from Brayden's own upper class accent.

"He has, darling," Brayden said, turning his iPhone to silent and replacing it in the inside pocket of his suit jacket. "They're meeting with the wedding planner this morning."

Alice played with the end of a few of her ringlets that hung over her delicate shoulders and watched Brayden glance as Wellesley placed a china cup and saucer with coffee in front of him.

"Thank you, Wellesley."

"But they haven't had the engagement party, yet," Alice replied.

"These things take time, darling, as I'm sure you'll learn one day."

Alice shook her head and half-smiled.

"I already told you, I'm not getting married."

"Good. You can stay my darling ten-year-old girl forever then," Brayden replied.

Alice exhaled an amused breath and didn't quite roll her eyes although the impression was there. She wasn't allowed to roll her eyes, joking manner or not.

Wellesley served breakfast before taking his place to stand in front of the French buffet, observing and waiting. The opposite side of the dining room behind Alice were ceiling-high windows with thick, beautiful drapes held back by cording, then secured to intricate brass ornaments on the walls.

Alice and Brayden's mealtime conversations were always intended to be a chance for them to speak as father and daughter, but with Alice always remembering she was not her father's equal. She was his child. When there were guests dining at Waldorf, she was not allowed to speak unless she was spoken to, although sometimes that rule was overlooked when the conversation was highly participatory, and she wanted to contribute. When it was just the two of them, Brayden encouraged his daughter to start and maintain active conversation on all matter of subjects, providing of course that it was appropriate and enriching. Although, it seemed the only enriching conversation for the moment was the most obvious: Bennett and Elisabeth's impending marriage.

"Is Aunty Evelyn and Uncle Jon hosting the engagement party?" Alice asked, between polite mouthfuls of her favourite breakfast, eggs benedict.

"Are," Brayden corrected.

"Are they?" Alice asked.

"Yes, darling," Brayden replied, dabbing his mouth with his napkin. "Harriet will be coming to fit you for your dress."

Alice sipped from her teacup and frowned.

"I thought I was wearing the one I wore for your birthday ball," she said, her heart set on it. She loved that dress.

Brayden stopped cutting his breakfast and glanced up at his daughter.

"You can't wear that one, darling, you've worn it already."

Alice's frown remained. "But you hate waste!"

Brayden paused the cutting of his breakfast once again and look at Alice.

"There are some conventions I won't ignore. In our circle, ladies do not wear the same dress to another event or social gathering."

"May I have the exact same dress but in a different colour, then?" Alice asked, as though she'd just come up with a brilliant idea.

"No darling, I've already emailed a picture of the design to Harriet. You just need to be in the sitting room on time for your measurements to be checked. The girls will come with most of the dress done already."

"They could probably make me a dress without even coming, by this point," Alice said, grinning.

Brayden smiled at his daughter's comfort and positivity toward her bespoke wardrobe and the process it took. His mother, Kathryn James, had been a serious advocate for custom-made and designed clothing. She never wanted to put on clothes that had been cut and tailored to another woman's body.

"Harriet will be bringing your recital dress with her, as well, when she comes."

Alice's eyes remained on her plate; she wanted to groan, so it was best if she didn't look up at all.

"Everyone's so looking forward to hearing you play again," Brayden added, glancing at her.

He knew his daughter wasn't keen on performing piano recitals in front of their close friends, but he saw it as necessary, especially considering he was also her piano teacher, and took great lengths to help her learn and then master the instrument.

Brayden's own two-decade-long musical tutelage had been ultimately overseen by his late father, Oliver James, who had been as kind and unconditionally loving as he'd been strict and rigid on matters regarding education, study, morality and discipline. His father had salaried a private piano teacher who taught Brayden until he was twenty-one years old and was fully supportive of the Russian teacher taking a cane to his son when he saw fit. Brayden's approach to Alice's piano study was definitely more gracious, although he punished for silly mistakes, backchat and whenever she needed to refocus. It was otherwise utterly amazing that she had picked up the piano in under a year and played as well as she did.

Alice had played her first piano recital several months into her new life at Waldorf and then took it upon herself to surprise Brayden with a small performance of sorts on her own.

Anabelle Greyson, the events coordinator from Tweed Events Co. had been hired in December by his best friend, Bennett Fowler, to host Brayden's twenty-ninth birthday ball. In the organisation of the ball, Anabelle also managed to oversee the rolling of the Steinway grand from the music room into the nearby ballroom without Brayden seeing or knowing anything of it. Having secretly practised and memorised Yiruma's "River Flows in You," Alice then played it (flawlessly) in front of over one hundred guests at the ball. It had been Brayden's pride, and took everything in him not to act emotionally in front of the ballroom full of friends and acquaintances. In his mind, it spoke to the appreciation she had for their lessons and the two-hour daily practise she'd worked up to. But she hated recitals.

juliazun on 07/28/2014 11:30am
I couldn't wait to read this fourth entry in the Waldorf Manor series, and I'm happy to say Miss Bryce did not let me down. It is so fascinating to watch these characters evolve - both personally and also in their relationships with each other. The story continues to be riveting and thought-provoking; especially in the way our society's idea of both romantic love and familial love are challenged. The relationships depicted in this book (and the others in the series) of married people, courting people, parents and their children, and even old and dear friendships are not what one typically sees in the 21st Century - and yet the story takes place in modern day England and illustrates beautifully that perhaps we could all learn a thing or two from these lovely characters and the way they treat each other. Well done Bella Bryce - I truly await your next entry in this series with joy and anticipation!
juliazun on 07/28/2014 11:30am
I couldn't wait to read this fourth entry in the Waldorf Manor series, and I'm happy to say Miss Bryce did not let me down. It is so fascinating to watch these characters evolve - both personally and also in their relationships with each other. The story continues to be riveting and thought-provoking; especially in the way our society's idea of both romantic love and familial love are challenged. The relationships depicted in this book (and the others in the series) of married people, courting people, parents and their children, and even old and dear friendships are not what one typically sees in the 21st Century - and yet the story takes place in modern day England and illustrates beautifully that perhaps we could all learn a thing or two from these lovely characters and the way they treat each other. Well done Bella Bryce - I truly await your next entry in this series with joy and anticipation!
KArc on 06/15/2014 10:34pm
I was very disappointed with this story. The characters are still wonderful but I am finding that as this series progresses it becomes less and less about the age-play and discipline and just becomes a slow story with a few spankings thrown in. I kept waiting for something to happen but nothing ever really did. I hope the author finds the intensity that she brought to life in the first book and brings it back to life in this series as I really like these characters and am anxious to read about Brayden and Anabelle.
KArc on 06/15/2014 10:34pm
I was very disappointed with this story. The characters are still wonderful but I am finding that as this series progresses it becomes less and less about the age-play and discipline and just becomes a slow story with a few spankings thrown in. I kept waiting for something to happen but nothing ever really did. I hope the author finds the intensity that she brought to life in the first book and brings it back to life in this series as I really like these characters and am anxious to read about Brayden and Anabelle.
Pooky on 06/13/2014 10:08am
It's easy to get attached to characters with a writer so in tune to all of their intimate details. Each character has their very unique personalities, feelings and even peculiarities. Not to mention that Bella Bryce paints each and every setting, dress, or dinner with an eye for perfecting the scene. I can see everything clearly in my mind's eyes as if living in the book itself. Each girl is obviously cherished by their father/uncle/husband and there is no shortage of cuddles. I have to be completely honest, this book was slow to start for me. I really couldn't get into it the first 40 or so pages. However, after that I couldn't stop reading if my life depended on it. And yes, I did say 40 pages. This isn't a simple finish in 1 hour book. For those of you begging for longer books, at over 100k this is the one for you to read.
Pooky on 06/13/2014 10:08am
It's easy to get attached to characters with a writer so in tune to all of their intimate details. Each character has their very unique personalities, feelings and even peculiarities. Not to mention that Bella Bryce paints each and every setting, dress, or dinner with an eye for perfecting the scene. I can see everything clearly in my mind's eyes as if living in the book itself. Each girl is obviously cherished by their father/uncle/husband and there is no shortage of cuddles. I have to be completely honest, this book was slow to start for me. I really couldn't get into it the first 40 or so pages. However, after that I couldn't stop reading if my life depended on it. And yes, I did say 40 pages. This isn't a simple finish in 1 hour book. For those of you begging for longer books, at over 100k this is the one for you to read.
Ann Low on 06/12/2014 08:13am
A lovely story in which one would need to read the earlier books in order to understand the context. Alice is growing up, albeit gradually under Brayden's care. Elizabeth is getting ready for her marriage to Benett while Evelyn and Jon finally overcomes the hurdle in their marriage, each coming out with great satisfaction in their love for each other. Brayden is hesitant over courting Anabelle, unaware that his feelings towards the latter is mutual. Alice chips in to help, and discovers along the way an aunt in Elizabeth... The review is given in exchange for receiving an ARC of this story.
Ann Low on 06/12/2014 08:13am
A lovely story in which one would need to read the earlier books in order to understand the context. Alice is growing up, albeit gradually under Brayden's care. Elizabeth is getting ready for her marriage to Benett while Evelyn and Jon finally overcomes the hurdle in their marriage, each coming out with great satisfaction in their love for each other. Brayden is hesitant over courting Anabelle, unaware that his feelings towards the latter is mutual. Alice chips in to help, and discovers along the way an aunt in Elizabeth... The review is given in exchange for receiving an ARC of this story.
Katy Beth McKee on 06/08/2014 01:15pm
Alice is continuing to thrive under Brayden's care. Bennett and Elizabeth are moving on in their engagement. And there is a hint in the air of a mommy for little Alice. This is a wonderful installment in the Waldorf Manor series. It is wonderful to see all of these characters as they grow and develop. There are some major changes in the lives of some of the supporting cast. Brayden realizes that as fulfilling as being a father to Alice is he needs to think beyond that. All of the characters have seem to learn more about love and caring for each other through their developing relationships. Love the hints of interesting romances to come as well.
Katy Beth McKee on 06/08/2014 01:15pm
Alice is continuing to thrive under Brayden's care. Bennett and Elizabeth are moving on in their engagement. And there is a hint in the air of a mommy for little Alice. This is a wonderful installment in the Waldorf Manor series. It is wonderful to see all of these characters as they grow and develop. There are some major changes in the lives of some of the supporting cast. Brayden realizes that as fulfilling as being a father to Alice is he needs to think beyond that. All of the characters have seem to learn more about love and caring for each other through their developing relationships. Love the hints of interesting romances to come as well.
jeanped on 06/05/2014 10:45am
I really enjoyed reading the 4th installment of this series and and am absolutely looking forward to the "last" book in the series (maybe with a little push, we can get Bella to continue the series with stories about the other characters already introduced in the book).
jeanped on 06/05/2014 10:45am
"I really enjoyed reading the 4th installment of this series and and am absolutely looking forward to the ""last"" book in the series (maybe with a little push, we can get Bella to continue the series with stories about the other characters already introduced in the book). "
dimples on 06/04/2014 10:38am
Please continue with these characters. There is so much we want to see happen. Loved the books. Please continue series
dimples on 06/04/2014 10:38am
Please continue with these characters. There is so much we want to see happen. Loved the books. Please continue series
Lila on 06/03/2014 07:48pm
I truly wish this wasn't the last book in the series. I'd love to follow these couples and Alice as she progresses into teenage and on to adulthood. I love the way Alice is portrayed. Her love for Brayden as a father and wanting to see him find his own adult love. Bennett and Elizabeth demonstrate how love should be; showing how much worth you put on the other by giving up your own desires to honor each other. Jon and Evelyn show how taking accountability for past mistakes, confession, and forgiveness can mend relationships. I look forward to other books by Bella Bryce.
Lila on 06/03/2014 07:48pm
I truly wish this wasn't the last book in the series. I'd love to follow these couples and Alice as she progresses into teenage and on to adulthood. I love the way Alice is portrayed. Her love for Brayden as a father and wanting to see him find his own adult love. Bennett and Elizabeth demonstrate how love should be; showing how much worth you put on the other by giving up your own desires to honor each other. Jon and Evelyn show how taking accountability for past mistakes, confession, and forgiveness can mend relationships. I look forward to other books by Bella Bryce.
Marybeth on 06/03/2014 07:27pm
The fourth book in the Waldorf Manor series. I think that this is the best book in the series! Bennett and Elisabeth are courting and are planning their wedding. Alice and Braydon are continuing on with their father/daughter relationship. Braydon is also interested in Anabelle, but doesn’t know if he should pursue her. And, this time we learn more about Evelyn and Jon, Bennett and Damian’s parents. Their relationship has a 180º turn. Jon decides to take Evelyn in hand. I think that this is the best so far in this series. Everyone’s relationships are evolving. Bennett becomes more understanding and less stiff as his love for Elisabeth progresses. Bennett has come a long way since the first book. He was more of an ass then. Braydon still has Alice, but he may have a relationship with Ana as well. Alice is continuing to grow. I love how she embraces being 10. Wonderful book!
Marybeth on 06/03/2014 07:27pm
The fourth book in the Waldorf Manor series. I think that this is the best book in the series! Bennett and Elisabeth are courting and are planning their wedding. Alice and Braydon are continuing on with their father/daughter relationship. Braydon is also interested in Anabelle, but doesn۪t know if he should pursue her. And, this time we learn more about Evelyn and Jon, Bennett and Damian۪s parents. Their relationship has a 180 turn. Jon decides to take Evelyn in hand. I think that this is the best so far in this series. Everyone۪s relationships are evolving. Bennett becomes more understanding and less stiff as his love for Elisabeth progresses. Bennett has come a long way since the first book. He was more of an ass then. Braydon still has Alice, but he may have a relationship with Ana as well. Alice is continuing to grow. I love how she embraces being 10. Wonderful book!
Ellienora35 on 06/01/2014 07:49am
The Glass House is another powerful narrative. By Bella Bryce. Without giving away some major spoilers, I will say that the characters in this book came even more alive to me and the relationships between Evelyn and Jonathan and Brayden and Anabelle grow in leaps and bounds. I love this book. 5 stars. Click buy and have a wonderful few hours of escape into the world of Waldorf Manor and things to think about for days after you read it. Also, the book has its own ending but keeps the reader hoping for the fifth book.
Ellienora35 on 06/01/2014 07:49am
The Glass House is another powerful narrative. By Bella Bryce. Without giving away some major spoilers, I will say that the characters in this book came even more alive to me and the relationships between Evelyn and Jonathan and Brayden and Anabelle grow in leaps and bounds. I love this book. 5 stars. Click buy and have a wonderful few hours of escape into the world of Waldorf Manor and things to think about for days after you read it. Also, the book has its own ending but keeps the reader hoping for the fifth book.

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